The Last King of Lydia

£9.9
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The Last King of Lydia

The Last King of Lydia

RRP: £99
Price: £9.9
£9.9 FREE Shipping

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Life is full of pleasures we shouldn’t turn down just because we worry they aren’t permanent or profound. Reading the story encourages a great deal of self-reflection and analysis which may leave the reader a little wiser by the end of the book. He also plays with Plato a bit, offering up a philosopher-king who becomes more of a philosopher as his station falls in life, resulting in the greatest insights arriving concomitant with his enslavement. It is only when Croesus has truly lost everything that he reflects on the words of the seer and how painfully true they have proved to be. This book is both a look at the history of the final days of and empire, and a small story about one man.

Herodotus and other Greek authors recounted a lot of myths that built up around him and threw some of their own in for good measure. It's intelligently written, often poetic, compelling and even though I knew the story of Croesus, it was full of surprises. Barely had you stopped breathing before you became an irrelevance, as though you had never lived at all. I didn’t know the subtleties and complexities of their lives, I often had no idea what characters were thinking, and the philosophy felt ham-handed and straining too hard for my attention. The first excellent thing about this book is that even if, like me, you’re an ancient history dunderhead, Leach eases you through it effortlessly.Croesus notes bitterly that the coinage bearing his family crest will last far longer than their kingdom. If you absolutely hate anything remotely like spoilers, you might want to stop reading now, although I don't think these will qualify as plot revealers. I didn’t feel like I was getting the full, rich story, but snatched glimpses of Croesus’ life, the bare bones of the plot needed to keep it moving on but no real fleshing out of the world.

Readers who revel in the material details of period costume, weapons and mores may be disappointed in this fabulistic treatment of the ancient king whose name became synonymous with wealth. Our features are original articles from our print magazines (these will say where they were originally published) or original articles commissioned for this site.So a more detailed expansion of the same tale that doesn’t do anything different or change anything but the style seems pointless to me.

Almost all the characters and their stories can be found in Herodotus: Solon, Cyrus, Harpagus, Adrastus and the rest.

Although some customs seem strange to us now, we're fully on board with them while immersed in the story fo Croesus. His gradual epiphany gives the book an optimistic feel despite some of the story’s brutal realities. Many Thanks to the team at Atlantic for sending me a copy of this book, and to Kate for tipping me off. that's how i feel about this one, which is a shame because i think i would have liked it in the right mood.

If you absolutely hate anything remotely like spoilers, you might want to stop reading now, although I don’t think these will qualify as plot revealers. The ancient world is so distant from us that at times it feels like fantasy - kings, gods, sacrifices, oracles, mountains of gold, lost cities, myth.Leach puts these words in the mouth of a 5th Century BC ruler, yet I’m not sure I’ve read a more apposite phrase to sum up what’s wrong with modern society. Characters talk out their motivations, their longings, and their regrets, and it is these conversations that are the heart of the story, despite the epic conquests and and empire-spanning travels that serve as the backdrop. Equally, it often feels like the author is using the philosophical element to push a certain moral on the reader when, let's be honest, we *know* that wealth isn't everything (although it does help if you have at least some money so you don't starve). The philosophical tone is set early on when Solon, the famous wise man of Athens, comes to visit Croesus.



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
  • Sold by: Fruugo

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